Canberra: Meet Your Neighbours exhibition at the Rock Garden section of the Australian National Botanic Gardens

by Dave Wong, Canberra, Australia

I feel very privileged to have some of my work, including Meet Your Neighbours images on display at two great locations in Canberra in the coming weeks and months.

Yesterday, with the great help of Megan, Dan and other staff from the Australian National Botanic Gardens, we installed Meet Your Neighbours images in the Rock Garden section of the Gardens. The images will be installed between the 3rd and 12th of March and will be lit up during the Luminous Botanicus II: Night Moods events that will be held at the Gardens for the next two Friday and Saturday nights. This event is part of the Enlighten festival.

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Variety: a tiny fraction of the species that can be found in the grasslands, woodlands and forests around Canberra.

It is great to have these images finally installed in an outdoor location (as was the original intention – inspired by Clay Bolt’s outdoor exhibit at the Highlands Botanical Garden – North Carolina). The ANBG is a perfect location for the exhibition as it is it set within Black Mountain, the place where I many of the species featured in the exhibition were photographed.

Field Studio setup used to photograph animals and plants at Black Mountain

Field Studio setup used to photograph animals and plants at Black Mountain, Canberra

I am really looking forward to seeing how the images look throughout the two weeks and how people interact with them. I am especially curious to see how they will look at the Enlighten event. Apparently there will even be a Shakuhachi master playing in the rock garden! A big thanks to all the staff of the ANBG who contributed in various ways to the exhibition organisation or installation of the exhibition including Jennifer Salkeld and Steve Speer and Dan. Particular thanks go to Megan Donaldson who handled much of the organisation and logistics behind the exhibition and came up with the concept of holding the exhibition in the Rock Garden as part of Enlighten.

Images installed in the Rock Garden of the Australian National Botanic Gardens

Images installed in the Rock Garden of the Australian National Botanic Gardens

Speaking of Enlighten, I think there would also be great potential for Meet Your Neighbours images to work as projected images onto buildings or screens in public places.

Another group show that will feature some of my work, including Meet Your Neighbours images, is Bush Capital: The Natural History of the ACT which opens on the 11th of March and runs until the 26th of June. I am really interested to see the show as it shows the variety of ways in which we can view the local ecosystems and species through artistic works, specimens, video and audio. There is also a great public program that accompanies the show. Many thanks to Rowan Henderson and Ian Fraser who co-curated the show and invited me to include work.

I hope that both of these shows will help to spark people’s interest in diversity of nature that is always nearby, particularly in the ‘Bush Capital’.

 

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Sunset on the Nicoya Peninsula

By Sean Graesser, Costa Rica: For the fifth year in a row I’ve returned to the dry forests of Costa Rica’s Nicoya peninsula, a place where many of North American’s Neotropical migrants choose to spend their winters. Mixed in with the wide variety of tropical birds species that inhabit the peninsula, there’s a lot of biodiversity to be seen.

One of the main study subjects we focus on is hummingbirds, at our main base of operation, we have eleven species of hummingbirds that we study. Long term banding studies on the site fidelity of the hummingbird species is one of our main focuses. We look at the ten resident species and one migrant species; we have been fortunate enough to recapture two Ruby-throated Hummingbirds that were previously banded in other years. Meaning this avian species that weights less than a penny traveled all the way to North America and back to Costa Rica traveling thousands of miles, while still being able to pick out the singular location amongst the ocean of green vegetation along the way.

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Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris)

Long-billed Starthroat (Heliomaster longirostris)

Long-billed Starthroat (Heliomaster longirostris)

Green-breasted Mango (Anthracothorax prevostii)

Green-breasted Mango (Anthracothorax prevostii)

Green-breasted Mango (Anthracothorax prevostii), Rufous-tailed Hummingbird (Amazilia tzacatl), and Steely-vented Hummingbird (Amazilia saucerottei)

Green-breasted Mango (Anthracothorax prevostii), Rufous-tailed Hummingbird (Amazilia tzacatl), and Steely-vented Hummingbird (Amazilia saucerottei)

 

We enjoy nice variety of colorful and unique native species in the area, many of them representing species not seen in North America. Some of the most striking species are the Motmot family, below is the Turquoise-browed Motmot (Eumomota superciliosa). Another boisterous and charismatic species on the peninsula is the Barred Antshrike (Thamnophilus doliatus), these small tenacious zebra striped birds give an almost raptor like appearance while zipping in and out of the forest.

 

 

Turquoise-browed Motmot (Eumomota superciliosa)

Turquoise-browed Motmot (Eumomota superciliosa)

Barred Antshrike (Thamnophilus doliatus)

Barred Antshrike (Thamnophilus doliatus)

I’ll be on the Nicoya Peninsula for a few weeks doing mostly avian research, but will be taking a plethora of MYN shots of any and all things that move. I’m going to post a few more entries through out my time here, so check back if you’re interested in seeing more of Costa Rica’s spectacular wildlife.

By Andrew Snyder, Mississippi, USA: Of the states in the southeastern United States, Mississippi isn’t generally the first to come to mind as being a hotbed of biodiversity, and in comparison to the others, it isn’t. However, the Magnolia State does harbor a substantial variety of species, especially ones small enough to fit on a sheet of acrylic or in a light box.

I first arrived in Oxford, Mississippi in 2011, when I started graduate school at the University of Mississippi in the northern section of the state. When not conducting research in Guyana (where most of my Meet Your Neighbours images have been captured), I have made an effort to get out and explore the new territories and habitats around here, and have subsequently been capturing images for MYN since joining in 2013.

Mississippi boasts many different habitats, from forests, to swamps, to coastal estuaries. However, all of the images that accompany this post were made within an hour’s drive outside of Oxford in north-central Mississippi. In fact, I have three favorite locations (so far) for capturing MYN images in this state.

Within a fifteen minute drive outside of Oxford is a wildlife refuge that supports hardwood forest, swamps, creeks, and a sizeable lake. This location is chock full of cottonmouths and other snakes, tree frogs, and a variety of fish. While taking part in a herpetology course that was offered at the University, I spent a lot of time here and also made some subsequent images during later trips.

Juvenile Bowfin, Amia calva, Water Valley, Mississippi, April, 2015

Juvenile Bowfin (Amia calva).

Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)

Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura)

Bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus, Elliott, Mississippi, April, 2015

Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus).

 

Tishomingo State Park in northeast Mississippi is a special place. This park contains arguably the most topographical complexity within the whole state and is home to a variety of salamanders that aren’t found anywhere else in the state. Fellow MYN photographer J.P. Lawrence and spent a few days one weekend this spring on a bit of a blitz here, knocking of some of the states Endangered species, and then some.

 

A composite of a variety of the reptiles and amphibians found at various locations in Mississippi this past spring.

A composite of a variety of the reptiles and amphibians found at various locations in Mississippi this past spring.

 

My third favorite location, and one that should relate to many of our photographers, is my own backyard. It should also be noted that I have only a few bushes out front and zero trees, but despite a dearth of quality habitat, I (or sometimes the dog) still routinely find new species to photograph. From mantids to beetles to moles, the point is, there are always cool creatures to be found as long as you start to look!

An Eastern mole (Scalopus aquaticus), photographed courtesy of my dog. Don't worry, it was released unharmed. My finger on the otherhand, was not.

An Eastern mole (Scalopus aquaticus), photographed courtesy of my dog. Don’t worry, it was released unharmed. My finger on the otherhand, was not.

A caterpillar hunter (Calosoma sayi) found on my front porch.

A caterpillar hunter (Calosoma sayi) found on my front porch.

 

As a parting note to this short post, and as an eventual parting “gift” of our legacy at Ole Miss, J.P. Lawrence and I donated a variety of our MYN images to be used on a fancy new Biology Department tent. Hopefully these images, seen by the thousands of students and alums that flock to Oxford for every football tailgate, inspire the future generations of Ole Miss students to study biology here.

 

Ole Miss Biology department tent featuring images from Andrew Snyder and JP Lawrence.

Ole Miss Biology department tent featuring images from Andrew Snyder and JP Lawrence.

Ole Miss Biology department tent featuring images from Andrew Snyder and JP Lawrence.

Ole Miss Biology department tent featuring images from Andrew Snyder and JP Lawrence.

Aug
27
0

Saving Salamanders

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By Todd Amacker, Tennessee, USA:

Beginning in the 1980s, emerging pathogens have contributed to a global decline in amphibian populations. As a result of disease and other factors, amphibians are the most imperiled terrestrial vertebrate class on Earth. With both ranavirus (a genus of viruses in the family Iridoviridae) and chytrid fungus (a fungus in the phylum Chytridiomycota) being two of the biggest culprits, biologists and veterinarians are investigating the prevalence and transmission of these pathogens in amphibian populations all over the world.

In the Southern Appalachian Mountains of Tennessee and North Carolina, researchers from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture in Knoxville have been studying ranavirus and chytrid fungus prevalence for the last decade in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Known as the ‘Salamander Capital of the World’, this relatively small area contains some thirty species of salamanders, several of which are endemic to the park itself. This makes amphibian research in the Southern Appalachians vital when attempting to understand the global significance of certain pathogens like ranavirus and chytrid fungus, which in general, remain understudied.

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, vast swathes of the Smoky Mountains had been logged. Many native species, including amphibians, were decimated as a result. After being decreed a National Park in 1934, the Smokies made an extraordinary recovery and are once again intact and forested with large, mature trees. This has given Southern Appalachian salamanders a second chance at survival. With the help of dedicated scientists and concerned citizens, salamanders in Tennessee and North Carolina are fighting to avoid what has been called the Sixth Mass Extinction.

For more conservation stories, images, and films, visit www.toddamacker.com.

By Maggie Everett, Marvelwood School

Language barriers are tough and there are few things that can overcome difficulties in communication when faced with such barriers. Fortunately pictures are one of these!

Marvelwood School is a private high school in Kent, Connecticut. For nearly a decade now we have been traveling to Panama to conduct wildlife research. However our studies are limited to a few weeks each year. To better document the incredible biodiversity in the area around the year, we decided to start a pilot program to arm kids from underserved areas near the Cocoblo Nature Reserve (CNR) with cameras. We call the program CLICK to Protect Biodiversity. CLICK stands for Communities Linking Internationally to raise Conservation awareness in Kids. While we were only able to find funding for six point and shoot cameras the pilot program generated a lot of excitement and will attempt to expand the program next year. Both Marvelwood students and the children from La Zahina, also had the opportunity to work with Meet Your Neigbours Photographers in the field and try their hand at using sophisticated camera equipment to take photos. Below is an excerpt from the journal of Maggie Everett, a student from Marvelwood School about her experience working with local children as part of the CLICK program during our March trip to Panama.

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“My favorite moment at the Cocobolo Nature Reserve (CNR) in Panama was the moment four young kids first walked into our base camp to help us photograph life in the reserve. They appeared to be of elementary school age and were wearing clothes like we do in the summer, their hair in braids, and one boy even had a red baseball cap on his head. But there was a definite border, a difference between me and them and that was the inability to communicate in a common language. They only spoke Spanish and I only spoke English. Frankly I was scared to be where I was in an unknown (and potentially dangerous) tropical forest, and trying to communicate and conduct scientific research with local children who did not speak the same language as I only compounded my anxiety. My anxiety began to diminish after the first few minutes of interaction as they seemed perfectly open and inviting to work with me and the other students and scientists that surrounded them.

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My eyes immediately drew to a young girl soon introduced to me as Nixi. She sported a small orange camera, given to her my Marvelwood School during the February trip for the purpose of trying to document biodiversity in and near CNR. She held it tightly in her hand as her eyes searched the grounds. She was beautiful and had a glow of intelligence, knowledge, enthusiasm and ambition that everyone dreams their child will have. Before long, she was clinging to me and smiling a pure smile of excitement and joy as she started snapping photos of the insects, frogs and birds we encountered. I looked down at my Canon Camera, a more sophisticated version of the point and shoot camera Niki was using, and decided to take a risk. I called her over and slowly and carefully placed the strap around her neck as she began to gasp in excitement. After 2 minutes of showing her how to look through it, zoom in and out, and take pictures, she was already up to my level in how to use my own camera! I watched as she ran around and continued to take photographs of her friends, the trees, birds, butterflies. Watching this young girl, who had probably never traveled more than 20 miles from her village in her young life, due to economic and travel limitations, immerse herself in photographing the natural world around her, caused me to reevaluate my own life. It was that moment, watching the joy and excitement oozing from Nixi, as she took advantage of the opportunity to explore her world through the lens of a camera, that my own now pointless problems melted away. I felt renewed, I felt free and happy and trusting. I felt true love from Nixi and those other amazing kids exploring CNR with us in our quest to document the incredible biodiversity in the reserve. I learned that pictures really are the world’s universal language! I also learned that collectively, children, regardless of ones socio-economic backgrounds, armed simply with a camera, can really make a difference and raise awareness about the incredible biodiversity in this world that needs to be conserved and protected!”

A huge shout-out to the Meet Your Neighbours Photographers Clay Bolt, Twan Leenders and Sean Graesser for helping the students from Marvelwood School and from La Zahina, explore the natural world in Panama through the lens of a Camera.

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Meet Your Neighbours Co-Founder Clay Bolt was honored to accept the North American Nature Photography Association‘s 2015 Environmental Impact award on behalf of Meet Your Neighbours during the annual summit in San Diego last week. Clay writes, “The last recipient was the incredible James Balog so its significance isn’t lost on me. More importantly, I was so touched to be on stage with many of my dearest friends and colleagues who have really been the ones to make the project a reality.” From the left: Chris Linder, Kevin FitzPatrick, Paul Marcellini, Roy Toft, Sheri Mandel, Nathan Dappen, Krista Schlyer, Clay Bolt, Neil Losin, Gabby Salazar, Karine Aigner and Paul Hassell. Other contributors who were present but unable to join us on stage were Andrew Snyder, JP Lawrence, Matthew Cicanese, Kika Tarsi Tuff, Todd Amacker, Steven David Johnson, Dave Huth. Photo © Gaston Lacombe / iLCP.

Aug
13
0

Texas Scorpion

-By Karine Aigner, Washington DC, USA: I was in Brownsville, Texas, having a nightmare of a time trying to photograph a 3 day old Texas tortoise that we had found. I had pretty much given up on the cheeky juvenile reptile when I heard something moving at my feet.  Strategically placed right at my foot was a cockroach the size of my thumb, seemingly pulling a scorpion.  But, the scorpion was attached to the roach’s backside, holding on! The cockroach was having some success at pulling itself across the floor until the scorpion, almost half the roach’s size, turned itself sideways (with me watching) while holding onto the roach, and without further ado slammed it’s tail into the roach four distinct times.  Not a minute later was the roach sedated, but not yet dead.  So, what did i do?  Throw them both onto the plexi and watch the scene play out. The scorpion waited till the roach stopped moving, then moved itself into position to start eating the roach head first.  It later turned it over and continued eating.

Round 1: The scorpion's first attempt to subdue its prey.

Round 1: The scorpion’s first attempt to subdue its prey.

The scorpion, after killing the much larger roach, begins feeding head first.

The scorpion, after killing the much larger roach, begins feeding head first.

 

 

Jul
18
0

Mozambican Memoirs

-By Todd Amacker, Tennessee, USA: I recently returned from a trip to rural Gaza Province, Mozambique, near Banhine National Park. Banhine is what people refer to as a ‘paper park’. Very little infrastructure, relatively few park rangers, and only small, skittish populations of megafauna. They certainly have reason to be skittish, after their animal kin were decimated during a brutal civil war that lasted for decades. The majority of locals living in the region rely on subsistence agriculture, which means that if their humble crops (mostly maize) fail, they go hungry. That’s why, in 2011, after moving back to the States from Africa, I founded MozCause. We’re revitalizing a small primary school in the village of Mafacitela, just outside of Banhine National Park. Such projects in this area are easier said than done. As an example, the cost and risk of transporting cinder blocks for a ten hour journey down a less-than-perfect dirt road was not on option, so we were left with one choice: to make our own cinder blocks on-site using river sand from the Changane River. But, by using local labor and limited building materials, we, along with the help of Búfalo Moçambique, a privately owned and operated wildlife reserve, replaced the school’s long-missing roof that until now has rendered the original school building useless. Small things like this make a world of difference to these undeniably resilient children of Mafacitela.

Students at Escola Primaria de Mafacitela, in rural Gaza Province, Mozambique, are supported by MozCause, a small NGO founded in 2011.

Students at Escola Primaria de Mafacitela, in rural Gaza Province, Mozambique, are supported by MozCause, a small NGO founded in 2011.

In between my visits to the school, where I was documenting our progress and chatting with the school’s headmaster, Gervásio Inácio Bambo, I spent my time at a bush camp at Búfalo Moçambique. Despite being the middle of the dry season, I was astonished by the amount of biodiversity found at the reserve, and elsewhere. Famed biologist E.O. Wilson describes insects and other invertebrates as being “the small things that run the world”. After a few hours spent looking for critters in this corner of Gaza Province, it’s no surprise that the world is still running relatively smoothly. There was no shortage of grasshoppers, katydids, praying mantids, spiders, frogs, and other small, fascinating creatures. In fact, my enthusiasm for these little things became contagious. Soon, every other person in camp was searching for photography subjects. The camp assistants, mostly local Mozambicans, proved to be the most effective critter getters.

At our bush camp near Banhine National Park, Mozambique, I enlisted the help of a camp assistant, James, to help me find a way to attract frogs at night. This is the result: a basket made from an ilala palm frond.

At our bush camp near Banhine National Park, Mozambique, I enlisted the help of a camp assistant, James, to help me find a way to attract frogs at night. This is the result: a basket made from an ilala palm frond.

A collection of frogs that we captured using the 'ilala basket method' at Búfalo Moçambique, a private game reserve near Banhine National Park, Mozambique.

A collection of frogs that we captured using the ‘ilala basket method’ at Búfalo Moçambique, a private game reserve near Banhine National Park, Mozambique.

I frequently scoured Ilala palms (Hyphaene coriacea) for frogs, as it seemed to be their favorite hiding place. But James, who I referred to as a ‘closet naturalist’, quickly showed me a short cut for attracting them using the same type of palm (above). Other camp workers brought me myriad grasshoppers of all shapes, sizes, and colors (below), and they even brought me a thick-tailed scorpion! This species is capable of spraying venom from its tail, so one must be careful when handling. Praying mantids from the genus Hoplocorypha also made for interesting finds. I can’t wait to return during the wet season (that is, if the maze of dirt roads leading to Búfalo Moçambique allows it.)

A praying mantid (Hoplocorypha sp.) next to the same type of ootheca (egg mass) from whence it emerged.

A praying mantid (Hoplocorypha sp.) next to the same type of ootheca (egg mass) from whence it emerged.

A tiny (but dangerous) scorpion that we found beneath a cinder block at night. Its danger is revealed by its thick tail and relatively puny pincers.

A tiny (but dangerous) scorpion that we found beneath a cinder block at night. Its danger is revealed by its thick tail and relatively puny pincers.

More of Todd’s images are at www.toddamacker.com.

 

 

 

© Don Filipiak | meetyourneighbours.net

Sometimes people ask, why should we care whether a salamander goes extinct? What value does it provide anyway? Well, I could go into details and statistics, but it comes down to the fact that our fellow creatures have just as much right to exist as we do. They have the right to simply “be.”

Please take a moment to read this message from Florida contributor Don Filipiak – Clay

“The beginnings of a species at its end. The Frosted flatwoods salamander (Ambystoma cingulatum) is a species in desperate need of a priority boost in the conservation world. This secretive mole salamander that once ranged along the Coastal Plain from S. Carolina to Alabama is now restricted to a scant four counties in Florida. Even with the remaining four locales being found in protected areas, misdirected management strategies may ultimately prove fatal for the Frosted flatwoods salamander. This caudate’s specific breeding parameters rely on intact ecotones (wire grass/cypress tupelo domes and flatwoods/coastal marsh) for egg deposition and larval development. Current management strategies in the area include prescribed burns that do not aim at restoring these ecotones, severely degrading the breeding site by allowing shrubby vegetation to invade. The few recent ecotone burns were conducted in winter (larval development period) which left the area exposed, burning away the grass matrix that the larva rely on for camouflage. The results are a paucity of breeding sites and increased isolation of local populations within the metapopulation. Compared to other endangered cases, this has the potential to be an easy fix. The remaining habitat is already protected, it’s not about expensive land acquisitions, it’s about restoration of existing breeding sites. We’re talking about ephemeral ponds, not an entire watershed. With a little man power and proper flatwoods fire, the restoration of a breeding site can be accomplished in one season. With more traditionally charismatic species (e.g. Red-cockaded Woodpecker) occupying the spotlight, the Frosted flatwoods salamanders may very well be overlooked into extinction.

Jun
18
0

Okinawa Neighbours

MYN Contributor Shawn Miller has been photographing many of the species living in Okinawa, Japan over the past several months. Here is a selection of some of his discoveries photographed in the Meet Your Neighbours Field Studio.

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The MYN Mission

Meet Your Neighbours is a worldwide photographic initiative dedicated to reconnecting people with the wildlife on their own doorsteps – and enriching their lives in the process. These creatures and plants are vital to people: they represent the first, and for some, the only contact with wild nature we have.