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© Seth Patterson | www.wildsnap.com

MEXICAN BURROWING TOAD (Rhinophrynus dorsalis)

Found from Texas down to Costa Rica, the Mexican Burrowing Toad spends most of its time underground and emerges to breed in temporary pools created by the season's first heavy rainfall. Listed as 'Least Concern' on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM, this amazing species of amphibian is found in many protected areas throughout its range and is currently not facing any significant threats.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Robin Moore | www.robindmoore.com

Hispaniola Yellow Tree Frog (Osteopilus pulchrilineatus)

You better have you sunglasses close by for this one! With a striking yellow colour unseen in any other frogs throughout Haiti, this frog from Haiti and the Dominican Republic, is definitely a blinding beauty!

Having always been very difficult to find, this frog which is listed as 'Vulnerable' on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM, is surprisingly more commonly heard in groups than spotted as single individuals. With a call that sounds like a squeaky door in a haunted house, can you imagine what a pool full of these frolicking frogs would sound like in their natural habitat?

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Joris van Alphen | www.jorisvanalphen.com

MALAYAN HORNED FROG (Megophrys nasuta)

The Mayalan Horned Frog is a deadly master in the art of camouflage. When this impressive ambush predator buries itself in the leaf litter of the forest floor, unwary prey never see their attacker until it strikes - and by then it's too late!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© João Burini | www.primalshutter.com

PUMPKIN TOADLETS (Brachycephalus ephippium)

Despite their name, you are not going to find these frogs in your Halloween pumpkin patch! With a maximum adult size of about 2 cm, these tiny pumpkin-coloured frogs are typically found foraging amongst the leaf litter on the forest floors of Brazil. Don't be fooled by their seemingly harmless appearance - they can secrete a tetrodotoxin-like compound called ephippiotoxin.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Marko Masterl

FIRE SALAMANDER (Salamandra salamandra)

While yellow spots on a black background may be fashionable to some, it actually serves an important purpose in the case of the Fire Salamander. This aposematic coloration serves as a visual warning to potential predators: eat me and you'll be sorry! This salamander can secrete neurotoxins through glands behind the eyes and down the length of its body - something a potential predator may find irritating!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Clay Bolt | www.claybolt.com

BRONZE FROG (Lithobates clamitans clamitans)

A fairly common frog throughout it’s range, the Bronze frog is listed as ‘Least Concern’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM. While most populations of this species are quite stable, some populations are under threat from habitat loss and degradation.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Robin Moore | www.robindmoore.com

SPINY GREEN FROG (Eleutherodactylus nortoni)

Roughly the size of an apple, the Spiny Green Frog with spectacular orange eyes is the largest species of Eleutherodactylus in Haiti. But don't let their rotund frame fool you because these frogs are quite agile climbers that prefer a life high above the ground in trees!

Found in the montane forests of south-western Haiti and the Dominican Republic, the Spiny Green Frog, listed as "Critically Endangered" on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM definitely lives up to its name!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Emanuel Biggi | www.anura.it

MARBLED REED FROG (Hyperolius marmoratus)

Sometimes it's a good thing when you're seeing spots! Listed as 'Least Concern' on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM, the Marbled Reed Frog is thankfully quite the abundant species of frog found throughout most of sub-Saharan Africa.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Andrew Snyder | www.andrewmsnyder.com

HORNED FROG (Ceratophrys cornuta)

With horns above the eyes and a mouth that is over 1.5 times wider than the entire length of its body, the Horned Frog is a rather unique looking frog that also has a voracious appetite! Lying in wait under the leaf litter with only its head sticking out, this well camouflaged ambush predator wastes no time pouncing on unsuspecting prey that come within range because if it can fit in the mouth, it's a meal!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Dirk Funhoff | www.dirk-funhoff.de

ALPINE NEWT (Triturus alpestris)

Losing an arm or a leg is no problem for some amphibians because they can easily regenerate new limbs, tissue and even eyes! This might seem like something straight out of a science fiction movie but in fact newts like this Alpine Newt sprout new limbs all the time!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Emanuel Biggi | www.anura.it

MARBLED REED FROG (Hyperolius marmoratus)

Sometimes it's a good thing when you're seeing spots! Listed as 'Least Concern' on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM, the Marbled Reed Frog is thankfully quite the abundant species of frog found throughout most of sub-Saharan Africa.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Andrew Snyder | www.andrewmsnyder.com

GIANT WAXY MONKEY TREEFROG (Phyllomedusa bicolor)

Calm, cool and collected is the best way to describe the frog that prefers to walk through the trees instead of hopping! And of course, let's not forget how their tadpoles casually drop from egg-clutches hanging from leaves into the water far below!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Clay Bolt | www.claybolt.com

NORTHERN TWO-LINED SALAMANDER (Eurycea bislineata)

Did you know that the Northern Two-Lined Salamander does not have lungs? Lungless salamanders make up the largest and most diverse family of salamanders that actually breathe through their skin. Because they can only absorb oxygen through moist skin, these salamanders have to stay moist and will inhabit areas that are typically damp and humid.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Niall Benvie | www.niallbenvie.com

EDIBLE FROG (Pelophylax kl. esculentus)

Frog legs anyone? Typically found hanging out on muddy banks, the Edible Frog can also be regularly found on dinner plates. A fertile hybrid of two other European frogs, the Pool Frog and the Marsh Frog, the Edible Frog is indeed edible and particularly enjoyed in France where frog legs are a popular menu item.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Clay Bolt | www.claybolt.com

NORTHERN TWO-LINED SALAMANDER (Eurycea bislineata)

Did you know that the Northern Two-Lined Salamander does not have lungs? Lungless salamanders make up the largest and most diverse family of salamanders that actually breathe through their skin. Because they can only absorb oxygen through moist skin, these salamanders have to stay moist and will inhabit areas that are typically damp and humid.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Dirk Funhoff | www.dirk-funhoff.de

ALPINE NEWT (Triturus alpestris)

Losing an arm or a leg is no problem for some amphibians because they can easily regenerate new limbs, tissue and even eyes! This might seem like something straight out of a science fiction movie but in fact newts like this Alpine Newt sprout new limbs all the time!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Robin Moore | www.robindmoore.com

Hispaniola Yellow Tree Frog (Osteopilus pulchrilineatus)

You better have you sunglasses close by for this one! With a striking yellow colour unseen in any other frogs throughout Haiti, this frog from Haiti and the Dominican Republic, is definitely a blinding beauty!

Having always been very difficult to find, this frog which is listed as 'Vulnerable' on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM, is surprisingly more commonly heard in groups than spotted as single individuals. With a call that sounds like a squeaky door in a haunted house, can you imagine what a pool full of these frolicking frogs would sound like in their natural habitat?

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Seth Patterson | www.wildsnap.com

MEXICAN BURROWING TOAD (Rhinophrynus dorsalis)

Found from Texas down to Costa Rica, the Mexican Burrowing Toad spends most of its time underground and emerges to breed in temporary pools created by the season's first heavy rainfall. Listed as 'Least Concern' on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM, this amazing species of amphibian is found in many protected areas throughout its range and is currently not facing any significant threats.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Robin Moore | www.robindmoore.com

SPINY GREEN FROG (Eleutherodactylus nortoni)

Roughly the size of an apple, the Spiny Green Frog with spectacular orange eyes is the largest species of Eleutherodactylus in Haiti. But don't let their rotund frame fool you because these frogs are quite agile climbers that prefer a life high above the ground in trees!

Found in the montane forests of south-western Haiti and the Dominican Republic, the Spiny Green Frog, listed as "Critically Endangered" on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM definitely lives up to its name!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Andrew Snyder | www.andrewmsnyder.com

HORNED FROG (Ceratophrys cornuta)

With horns above the eyes and a mouth that is over 1.5 times wider than the entire length of its body, the Horned Frog is a rather unique looking frog that also has a voracious appetite! Lying in wait under the leaf litter with only its head sticking out, this well camouflaged ambush predator wastes no time pouncing on unsuspecting prey that come within range because if it can fit in the mouth, it's a meal!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© João Burini | www.primalshutter.com

PUMPKIN TOADLETS (Brachycephalus ephippium)

Despite their name, you are not going to find these frogs in your Halloween pumpkin patch! With a maximum adult size of about 2 cm, these tiny pumpkin-coloured frogs are typically found foraging amongst the leaf litter on the forest floors of Brazil. Don't be fooled by their seemingly harmless appearance - they can secrete a tetrodotoxin-like compound called ephippiotoxin.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Marko Masterl

GREEN FROG (Rana clamitans)

GUNK goes the North American Green Frog - a rather impressive rendition of a loose banjo string! With its unique and easily identified call, the Green Frog is readily found by almost any body of water throughout southeastern Canada and the eastern United States.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Andrew Snyder | www.andrewmsnyder.com

GIANT WAXY MONKEY TREEFROG (Phyllomedusa bicolor)

Calm, cool and collected is the best way to describe the frog that prefers to walk through the trees instead of hopping! And of course, let's not forget how their tadpoles casually drop from egg-clutches hanging from leaves into the water far below!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© John Tiddy | www.johntiddyphotography.com

SOUTHERN BROWN TREE FROG (Litoria ewingii)

Heard throughout the year across Australia and New Zealand is the whistling call of male Southern Brown Tree Frogs. With their seemingly insatiable appetites, these agile little frogs climb and leap throughout the trees, often catching insects in mid-leap!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© John Tiddy | www.johntiddyphotography.com

SOUTHERN BROWN TREE FROG (Litoria ewingii)

Heard throughout the year across Australia and New Zealand is the whistling call of male Southern Brown Tree Frogs. With their seemingly insatiable appetites, these agile little frogs climb and leap throughout the trees, often catching insects in mid-leap!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Clay Bolt | www.claybolt.com

BRONZE FROG (Lithobates clamitans clamitans)

A fairly common frog throughout it’s range, the Bronze frog is listed as ‘Least Concern’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened SpeciesTM. While most populations of this species are quite stable, some populations are under threat from habitat loss and degradation.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Joris van Alphen | www.jorisvanalphen.com

MALAYAN HORNED FROG (Megophrys nasuta)

The Mayalan Horned Frog is a deadly master in the art of camouflage. When this impressive ambush predator buries itself in the leaf litter of the forest floor, unwary prey never see their attacker until it strikes - and by then it's too late!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Marko Masterl

FIRE SALAMANDER (Salamandra salamandra)

While yellow spots on a black background may be fashionable to some, it actually serves an important purpose in the case of the Fire Salamander. This aposematic coloration serves as a visual warning to potential predators: eat me and you'll be sorry! This salamander can secrete neurotoxins through glands behind the eyes and down the length of its body - something a potential predator may find irritating!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Clay Bolt | www.claybolt.com

GRAY TREEFROG (Hyla versicolor)

Now you see me, now you don't! In a process called metachrosis, the Gray Tree Frog can change the entire colour of its body to match its surroundings within just 30 minutes!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Clay Bolt | www.claybolt.com

GRAY TREEFROG (Hyla versicolor)

Now you see me, now you don't! In a process called metachrosis, the Gray Tree Frog can change the entire colour of its body to match its surroundings within just 30 minutes!

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Niall Benvie | www.niallbenvie.com

EDIBLE FROG (Pelophylax kl. esculentus)

Frog legs anyone? Typically found hanging out on muddy banks, the Edible Frog can also be regularly found on dinner plates. A fertile hybrid of two other European frogs, the Pool Frog and the Marsh Frog, the Edible Frog is indeed edible and particularly enjoyed in France where frog legs are a popular menu item.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia

© Marko Masterl

GREEN FROG (Rana clamitans)

GUNK goes the North American Green Frog - a rather impressive rendition of a loose banjo string! With its unique and easily identified call, the Green Frog is readily found by almost any body of water throughout southeastern Canada and the eastern United States.

ARKive  -  YouTube  -  Wikipedia
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